Monday, November 23, 2009

“You cannot explain an improbability of this magnitude (universe coming into being by accident) by simply pointing to our presence on the scene to ponder it. There is still a massive improbability that needs to be accounted for.”
Dinesh D’Souza “What’s so great about Christianity

6 comments:

Tristan Vick said...

I would love to debate Dinesh D'Souza in the future. He's very predictable, and I find his arguments are based off of common misconceptions which he ignores in order to maintain a semblance of authority. However, I have deconstructed numerous speeches of his, and I think engaging him in a debate would be great fun. He seems like a very nice man.

tinkbell13 said...

Yes, I feel that way about him too.

I don't believe in Santa Claus, the Tooth Fairy, the Easter Bunny, or God.

JD Curtis said...

Try reading What's So Great About Christianity?. I gave it away to about 6 different people this year. It's a great book.

I don't believe in Santa Claus

Sattelite imagery of the North Pole would disprove his existance.

the Tooth Fairy

Cameras set up near the child's bed would reveal it to be a parent that leaves the coin under the pillow.

the Easter Bunny

Who claims the bunny is real?

God

How many archeologically verifiable facts have been discovered that were first known only through the the foundational documents of the other three compared to the Holy Bible?

If the answer is zero, youre comparing apples and oranges.

If the answer is greater than zero, please list any examples here for review/ridicule.

Tristan D. Vick said...

I've gone through What's So Great About Christianity about five times. I actually find D'Souza lies three times, flat out, and uses propoganda to support the whole Nazi/Atheist thing without so much as doing so much as any real research on it. And he misapplies some well known quotes in misleading ways... Victor Stegner critiques Dinesh's tactics in his recent book "New Atheism" and shows how Dinesh purposefully is generating misinformation.

Dinesh sticks to devotional quips and maintains the rock headed stereotype of atheists. None of this suggests a good book, simply a boisterous opinion. And the reason I say this is I know Dinesh is a smart enough guy to tackle the real information and do some real scholarly research. But I don't think that was his intention or primary goal.

Also, JD, I think you may be forgetting that the absence of evidence is good evidence of absence. Moreover, things Christians have claimed for centuries, that the Eucharist and transubstantiation is real, that God answers prayers, that faith healing works, etc. are all well within the realm of science, in which we can apply the scientific method.

As for your quotes about ancient manuscripts, I don't know what you're trying to say. Again, stupid ole me, right? *Smacks forehead.

Peace out!

JD Curtis said...

Also, JD, I think you may be forgetting that the absence of evidence is good evidence of absence.

I am reminded of a farcical you-tube video which argued that Jesus of Nazereth was not a historical figure because certain writers of His time did not mention Him. All of this flies in the face of the writers of the 27 books of the New Testament, 18 pagan authors and 3 Jewish writers.

things Christians have claimed for centuries, that the Eucharist and transubstantiation is real

I believe this is limited to Catholicism. I'm not Catholic so I don't have a dog in that hunt.

that God answers prayers, that faith healing works

Probably statisical. Even if it could not be proven via mathematics, there are countless testimonies of people who are convinced that such things did occur, regardless of any studies on the matter.

As for your quotes about ancient manuscripts, I don't know what you're trying to say.

That was a reference to Tink-a-dink's comparison to belief in God with belief in the Easter Bunny, Santa Claus or the Tooth Fairy. Show me where 2000 years worth of exegesis exists in support of the other 3 and I concede the point.

JD Curtis said...

Tristan, you noted 3 errors in D'Souza's book. Name one of them and if you like, we can examine it. I have my copy right here next to my computer.